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La saison des tornades USA 2008 est vraiment très active cette année.

 

Déja on a parlé de plusieurs outbreak en janvier - pas exceptionnel, mais rarement autant si tôt alors que la saison n'est pas vraiment débuté. Voici un graphique qui exprime bien que 2008 est exceptionnel jusqu'à maintenant en étant de très loin au dessus de la moyenne et aussi de l'histoire récente.

 

Et ce n'est qu'un début, encore cette semaine il y a de très fortes possibilités d'avoir un autre Outbreak (voir sujet : Discussion: Tempête du 5 mars ou visitez le Forum Risques Météo)

 

http://pages.infinit.net/vlnvopok/stat_tornade_2008.gif

Edited by Regg001
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Weekly Climate Summary for 23 February 2008 through 7 MARCH 2008 UTC

South Pole Station, Antarctica

 

 

The week's hottest temperature was 111.2 degrees Fahrenheit (44.0 degrees Celsius) at Saint-Louis, Senegal.

 

The week's coldest temperature was minus 78.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 61.1 degrees Celsius) at Russia's Vostok Antarctic research station

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CHINA COLD !!

 

The most severe winter conditions in 50 years across parts of China have blocked the feeding paths of many wild animals, according to officials.

"We estimate that some 100,000 wild animals have been trapped in the mountains to the southwest of Xinjiang," said Dai Zhigang, head of the endangered animal protection station of the Forestry Bureau of Kashi Prefecture, in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

 

Dai told the Xinhua news agency that new sightings of dead animals, mainly grazing species and wild birds, have been reported by wardens every day since Feb. 7, when the blizzard waned.

 

He said that there were once about 4,000 argali wild sheep roaming the area.

 

The rare species may face extinction due to lack of food in early spring, when mountain vegetation will be hard to find after the snowstorm.

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CHINA DUST !!

 

A massive cloud of yellow sand blew from China into parts of South Korea and Japan, forcing schools to close and creating a health hazard, according to officials.

Between March and May every year, large quantities of yellow sand are sent airborne from the Gobi and Taklamakan deserts, with much of it being transported by westerly winds to Japan and the Korean Peninsula.

 

Some of the sand becomes saturated with toxic pollution spewed into the air across China's industrialized regions.

 

Residents downwind are advised to stay indoors or wear face masks while venturing outdoors during times that clouds of the yellow sand are thick.

 

For centuries, China experienced regular outbreaks of sand storms, but the latter half of the twentieth century brought a sharp increase in these storms, likely due to human activities such as overgrazing and deforestation.

 

From AD 300 to 1949, a sand storm typically struck northwestern China every 31 years. After 1990, the occurrence increased to once a year.

 

As China industrialized, the dust storms began to pose new hazards as the sand plumes picked up toxins on their way to the sea.

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JELLYFISH RULES !!

 

Spanish authorities warned those heading to the countrys Mediterranean coast that massive swarms of jellyfish are likely to cause a hazard to bathers this summer, even in the shallow waters near shore.

The Barcelona-based Institute of Marine Sciences says overfishing has eliminated many of the natural predators and competitors that used to keep the gooey invertebrate population under control.

 

Institute research professor Josep-Maria Gili said the recent growth in jellyfish numbers is a message from the sea that something is wrong.

 

Other marine experts say that global warming has also brought about the ideal conditions for jellyfish to breed in the western Mediterranean: mild temperatures, little rain and a lack of the usual winter rainstorms.

 

Similar growth in jellyfish populations has recently occurred in Japan, Namibia, Alaska, Venezuela and western Australia, Gili said.

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the coldest and hottest temperture for the week ending march 14th 2008.

 

The week's hottest temperature was 111.2 degrees Fahrenheit (44.0 degrees Celsius) at Kosti, Sudan.

 

The week's coldest temperature was minus 77.6 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 60.9 degrees Celsius) at the U.S. Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station.

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IT LOOKS LIKE THE SOUTH POLE WILL GET RECORD ICE FORMATION AGAIN FOR THE 2008 - SEASON. STATIONS ARE REPORTING BELOW NORMAL TEMPS

AND WINDS ALOFT ARE BELOW NORMAL. SEA ICE FORMATION IS ABOVE AVERAGE FOR THIS TIME OF THE YEAR. THE NORTH POLE IS ALSO ABOVE AVERAGE IN TERMS OF ICE PACK COMPARED TO THE LAST 9 YEARS.THIS TREND WILL CONTINUE FOR THE NEXT FEW YEARS AS THE ARCTIC AND THE ANTARCTIC

SEA CURRENTS ARE GOING BACK TO NORMAL IN TERMS OF SEA ICE PRESSURE

BEING STABLE NOW.GLOBAL WARMING WILL HAVE LITTLE AFFECT THIS YEAR

ON THE ICE PACK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCE... ICEBERG

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IT LOOKS LIKE THE SOUTH POLE WILL GET RECORD ICE FORMATION AGAIN FOR THE 2008 - SEASON. STATIONS ARE REPORTING BELOW NORMAL TEMPS

AND WINDS ALOFT ARE BELOW NORMAL. SEA ICE FORMATION IS ABOVE AVERAGE FOR THIS TIME OF THE YEAR. THE NORTH POLE IS ALSO ABOVE AVERAGE IN TERMS OF ICE PACK COMPARED TO THE LAST 9 YEARS.THIS TREND WILL CONTINUE FOR THE NEXT FEW YEARS AS THE ARCTIC AND THE ANTARCTIC

SEA CURRENTS ARE GOING BACK TO NORMAL IN TERMS OF SEA ICE PRESSURE

BEING STABLE NOW.GLOBAL WARMING WILL HAVE LITTLE AFFECT THIS YEAR

ON THE ICE PACK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCE... ICEBERG

et pis pm dit que il fera plus chaud et que les pole aura disparu dans 30 ans??

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IT LOOKS LIKE THE SOUTH POLE WILL GET RECORD ICE FORMATION AGAIN FOR THE 2008 - SEASON. STATIONS ARE REPORTING BELOW NORMAL TEMPS

AND WINDS ALOFT ARE BELOW NORMAL. SEA ICE FORMATION IS ABOVE AVERAGE FOR THIS TIME OF THE YEAR. THE NORTH POLE IS ALSO ABOVE AVERAGE IN TERMS OF ICE PACK COMPARED TO THE LAST 9 YEARS.THIS TREND WILL CONTINUE FOR THE NEXT FEW YEARS AS THE ARCTIC AND THE ANTARCTIC

SEA CURRENTS ARE GOING BACK TO NORMAL IN TERMS OF SEA ICE PRESSURE

BEING STABLE NOW.GLOBAL WARMING WILL HAVE LITTLE AFFECT THIS YEAR

ON THE ICE PACK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOURCE... ICEBERG

Please turn caps off. Usually, caps on means that you are yelling. Thanks.

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End to Australia Heat Wave

 

--Southern Australia:

 

It has been a hot month thus far in southern Australia with Monday being one of its hotter days from Adelaide to Melbourne. Indeed, Adelaide, which had seven days in 10 reaching at least 100 degrees F (near 38 C), has been hot for two full weeks leading to a monthly average temperature (March to date) more than 10 degrees F (nearly 6 degrees C) above normal. Monday had 104-105 F, or near 40 C) And Melbourne has been warmer than usual by nearly 7 degrees since the start of March. Monday`s 100-degree heat (101-102 degrees F, or about 39 C) made it five days of at least 100 degrees.

 

Sunday was even hotter than Monday in southern Australia. Eucla hit 109 degrees and Forrest reached 108 (this is near 42 D); both are in southeastern Western Australia. In South Australia, Port Augusta had 106 degrees (41 C). In Victoria, southernmost (and thus coolest) of the Australian mainland, Avalon heated to 108 degrees Monday whereas Geelong topped out 107 degrees.

 

--For southern Australia between Adelaide and Melbourne, Monday marked then end of the late-summer heat wave owing to a moderate, but highly important, cold front. Tuesday, the southeast corner of Australia--easternmost Victoria into southeastern New South Wales--will get one more shot at 100-degree heat thanks to a northwesterly wind flow. By Wednesday, the cold front will put an end to this.

 

--South Asia:

 

Speak of heating up, the Subcontinent has done exactly that. Widespread Monday was 100-degree F (38 C) from Gujarat east to West Bengal and from Maharashtra north to Rajasthan and even Haryana. Akola, in Maharashtra, led the way with 104 degrees (39.8 C). This heat befits mid April, but is above-normal for mid March.

 

At the same time, Sri Lanka and southernmost India (Tamil and Kerala) have been rainy of late. In Sri Lanka, Batticaloa got 7.1 inches (178 mm) of rain Sunday through Monday. This amount is more than twice the average monthly rain for March. The rain may be linked to the heat farther north.

 

I foresee few more days of at least scattered downpour, based upon numerical forecasts.

 

--North Asia:

 

High winds over Mongolia and nearby Russia (Buryatiya and Chita) raised dust storms Monday over the Mongolian desert. This dust may be seen Tuesday and Wednesday over cities from Beijing, China, to Seoul, South Korea.

 

--Near East:

 

Numerical forecast show a strong ridge (high pressure aloft) over northeast Africa to northwest Arabia by the end this week. If true, this would coincide with a late-march heat wave centered upon Egypt.

 

--Antarctica:

 

Time to cool things off some. In Antarctica, where it is still late summer, Concordia Dome station had a thermometer reading at least 88 degrees F (66.5 C) below zero. Late last week, it was as cold as -85 degrees F (-64.8 C) at Amundsen-Scott station, at the South Pole.

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Arctic Sea Ice Still At Risk Despite Cold Winter, NASA Says

 

ScienceDaily (Mar. 19, 2008) Using the latest satellite observations, NASA researchers and others report that the Arctic is still on "thin ice" when it comes to the condition of sea ice cover in the region. A colder-than-average winter in some regions of the Arctic this year has yielded an increase in the area of new sea ice, while the older sea ice that lasts for several years has continued to decline.

On March 18 the scientists said they believe that the increased area of sea ice this winter is due to recent weather conditions, while the decline in perennial ice reflects the longer-term warming climate trend and is a result of increased melting during summer and greater movement of the older ice out of the Arctic.

 

Perennial sea ice is the long-lived, year-round layer of ice that remains even when the surrounding short-lived seasonal sea ice melts away in summer to its minimum extent. It is this perennial sea ice, left over from the summer melt period, that has been rapidly declining from year to year, and that has gained the attention and research focus of scientists. According to NASA-processed microwave data, whereas perennial ice used to cover 50-60 percent of the Arctic, this year it covers less than 30 percent. Very old ice that remains in the Arctic for at least six years comprised over 20 percent of the Arctic area in the mid to late 1980s, but this winter it decreased to just six percent.

 

According to Walt Meier of the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado, Boulder, as ice ages it continues to grow and thicken, so that older ice is generally also thicker ice. This winter the ice cover is much thinner overall and thus in a more vulnerable state heading into the summer melt season. NASA's ICESat satellite has contributed to understanding of the changes in ice thickness. To get a better understanding of the behavior of sea ice, NASA is planning a follow-on satellite mission, ICESat II, to launch in 2015.

 

Arctic sea ice grows and declines seasonally, ranging from an average minimum extent in September of 2.5 million square miles to an average winter maximum extent of 5.9 million square miles in March. This March, instruments on NASA's Aqua satellite and NOAA and U.S. Defense Department satellites showed the maximum sea ice extent slightly increased by 3.9 percent over that of the previous three years, but it is still below the long-term average by 2.2 percent. Increases in ice extent occurred in areas where surface temperatures were colder than the historical averages. At the same time, as a result of the export of ice from the Arctic, the area of perennial ice decreased to an all-time minimum.

 

Joey Comiso of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., the lead author of a 2007 related study, used data from NASA's passive microwave data set to establish that the perennial ice cover at the summer Arctic ice minimum in 2007 was about 40 percent less than the 28-year average. According to the latest observations from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (an organization partially funded by NASA), perennial sea ice dropped from about 40 percent of the total ice pack last year to 30 percent of total ice this winter. The perennial ice is also growing younger, meaning that it is thinner and will be more vulnerable during the summer melt period.

 

In light of the Arctic's cold spell this winter, NASA satellites and scientists will continue to carefully watch conditions in the Arctic Ocean as summer settles in to better determine the extent of the perennial sea ice.

post-2-1205895361_thumb.jpg

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Encore moi et encore en Inde du sud (Kerala)

 

Plusieures orages (hors saisons) de 1 a 4 hrs de dure ces dernieres 2 semaines.

De 5 a 15 centimetres chaques orages. Degats mineurs sous formes de coulers de boue.

 

Ces orages sont qualifiers comme du jamais vue etant donne leurs frequence, leurs durees et leurs intensitees pour la saisons. La mousson ici est du 20 mai au 15 septembre.

post-2-1205934005_thumb.jpg

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Rennes , 8h 30 am (bretagne , france) PREMIERE CHUTE DE NEIGE DE L 'HIVER 2007-2008 !!

 

Le souci , c est que nous sommes déja au printemps ,et que l on devrait avoir 14 deg.Mais j aurais quand meme vu mes flocaons cet hiver ,enfin, c estait pas trop tot!!

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Inde du sud -

 

Les conditions s agrave ici dans tout le sud de l Inde alors que les pluies et orages hors saisons s abattent de facon continue.

 

Les domages sont surtout du cotee des recoltes mais la foudre et les coullees de boue font des victimes.

 

Au Kerala, la ou je me trouve en ce moment, les gens disent que cela prendrait au moin 2 mois pour faire le menage et nettoyer les degats aux recoltes avant la mousson qui debute autour du 20 mai.

 

La situation est problematique donc, inquietante et completement imprevisible.

 

Si vous en savez plus sur la situation meteorologique de cette region de l asie, vos analises et commentaires sont plus que bienvenues.

 

Redondant a dire mais, a suivre !

 

(desole pour la ponctuation...)

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Réchauffement climatique

Un immense pan de la banquise antarctique se détache

Mise à jour : 26/03/2008 16h33

 

Un pan de la banquise antarctique équivalent à près de quatre fois la superficie de la ville de Paris a commencé à se désintégrer sous l'effet du réchauffement climatique.

 

Cette désintégration porte déjà sur un pan de glace de 414 km carrés faisant partie de ce qu'on appelle «le plateau Wilkins». Tout aurait commencé le 28 février par le soudain décrochage d'un iceberg de 25 km et demi de long sur 2,4 km de large sur le flanc sud-ouest. Il s'agit de la plus grande banquise dans l'Antarctique.

 

L'été touchant à sa fin dans l'Antarctique, les scientifiques ne prévoient pas davantage de désintégration du plateau Wilkins dans les prochains mois.

 

http://lcn.canoe.ca/lcn/infos/lemonde/arch...326-163357.html

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