Jump to content

Ailleurs dans le monde...


dann17

Recommended Posts

el nino power !!

 

(Jan. 28, 2008) The next time you have to raise your umbrella against torrents of cold winter rain, you may have a remote weather phenomenon to thank that many may know by name as El Nino, but may not well understand.

 

 

Researchers now believe that some of the most intense winter storm activity over parts of the United States may be set in motion from changes in the surface waters of far-flung parts of the Pacific Ocean. Siegfried Schubert of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., and his colleagues studied the impact that El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events have on the most intense U.S. winter storms.

 

An ENSO episode typically consists of an El Niño phase followed by a La Niña phase. During the El Niño phase, eastern Pacific temperatures near the equator are warmer than normal, while during the La Niña phase the same waters are colder than normal. These fluctuations in Pacific Ocean temperatures are accompanied with fluctuations in air pressure known as the Southern Oscillation.

 

ENSO is a coupled ocean-atmosphere effect that has a sweeping influence on weather around the world. Scientists found that during El Niño winters, the position of the jet stream is altered from its normal position and, in the U.S., storm activity tends to be more intense in several regions: the West Coast, Gulf States and the Southeast. They estimate, for example, that certain particularly intense Gulf Coast storms that occur, on average, only once every 20 years would occur in half that time under long-lasting El Niño conditions. In contrast, under long-lasting La Nina conditions, the same storms would occur on average only about once in 30 years. A related study was published this month in the American Meteorological Society's Journal of Climate.

 

The scientists examined daily records of snow and rainfall events over 49 U.S. winters, from 1949-1997, together with results from computer model simulations. According to Schubert, the distant temperature fluctuations in Pacific Ocean surface waters near the equator are likely responsible for many of the year-to-year changes in the occurrence of the most intense wintertime storms.

 

"By studying the history of individual storms, we've made connections between changes in precipitation in the U.S. and ENSO events in the Pacific," said Schubert, a meteorologist and lead author of the study. "We can say that there is an increase in the probability that a severe winter storm will affect regions of the U.S. if there is an El Niño event."

 

"Looking at the link between large-scale changes in climate and severe weather systems is an emerging area in climate research that affects people and resources all over the world," said Schubert. "Researchers in the past have tended to look at changes in local rainfall and snow statistics and not make the connections to related changes in the broader storm systems and the links to far away sources. We found that our models are now able to mimic the changes in the storms that occurred over the last half century. That can help us understand the reasons for those changes, as well as improve our estimates of the likelihood that stronger storms will occur."

 

El Niño events, which tend to climax during northern hemisphere winters, are a prime example of how the ocean and atmosphere combine to affect climate and weather, according to Schubert. During an El Niño, warm waters from the western Pacific move into the central and eastern equatorial Pacific, spurred by changes in the surface wind and in the ocean currents. The higher sea surface temperatures in the eastern equatorial Pacific increase rainfall there, which alters the positions of the jet streams in both the northern and southern hemispheres. That in turn affects weather in the U.S. and around the world.

 

Scientists have known about El Niño weather fluctuations over a large portion of the world since the early 1950s. They occur in cycles every three to seven years, changing rain patterns that can trigger flooding as well as drought.

 

Schubert cautions against directly linking a particular heavy storm event to El Niño with absolute certainty. "This study is really about the causes for the changes in probability that you'll have stronger storms, not about the causes of individual storms," he said. For that matter, Schubert also discourages linking a particularly intense storm to global warming with complete certainty.

 

"Our study shows that when tropical ocean surface temperature data is factored in, our models now allow us to estimate the likelihood of intense winter storms much better than we can from the limited records of atmospheric observations alone, especially when studying the most intense weather events such as those associated with ENSO," said Schubert. "But, improved predictions of the probability of intense U.S. winter storms will first require that we produce more reliable ENSO forecasts." NASA's Global Modeling and Assimilation Office is, in fact, doing just that by developing both an improved coupled ocean-atmosphere-land model and comprehensive data, combining space-based and in situ measurements of the atmosphere, ocean and land, necessary to improve short term climate predictions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 190
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

Foehn (Föhn):

 

Pour ceux qui ne savent pas, c'est l'équivalent du Chinook Canadien pour l'Europe.

 

D'autres exemples de noms pour ce phénomène de masse d'air qui passe au dessus d'un cap montagneux pour s'engouffrer dans une vallée ou des terres basses sur l'autre versant.

 

Zonda winds en Argentine

Chinook et Chugach pour les montagnes d'Alaska

Nor'wester en Nouvelle Zélande

Halny dans l'Est de l'Europe

Fogony dans les Pirénées.

Bergwind en Afrique du Sud

Viento Sur dans le nord de l'Espagne

Terral dans le sud de l'Espagne

Föhn en Autriche, sud de l'Allemagne, Suisse

Helm wind en Angleterre.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hein ?!!? Tu déconnes ??! Où ça ???? je vois bien un coup de foehn là dessous...

Oui surement mais même là, le foehn est plutôt actif en altitude (plus de 1000 1500m) et rarement dans les vallées. A moins que le 700m soit un sommet de montagne mais dans ce cas ce n'est pas dans les alpes!

 

Est-ce une info vérifiée ou une personne qui a laissé chauffer son thermomètre au soleil?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hein ?!!?  Tu déconnes ??!  Où ça ???? je vois bien un coup de foehn là dessous...

Oui surement mais même là, le foehn est plutôt actif en altitude (plus de 1000 1500m) et rarement dans les vallées. A moins que le 700m soit un sommet de montagne mais dans ce cas ce n'est pas dans les alpes!

 

Est-ce une info vérifiée ou une personne qui a laissé chauffer son thermomètre au soleil?

Tu rigoles ? Le foëhn est aussi actif en altitude qu'en vallée, c'est justement en redescendant dans une vallée qu'il provoque chaleur et assèchement. Là d'où je viens en France, il arrive que, par coup de foëhn, la température grimpe de 15 degrés, même en pleine nuit, et en fond de vallée.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quand j'énonce des données, elles sont toujours valables, je ne suis pas un charlatan ou un djeun's qui aime faire du sensationnalisme, que ce soit clair.

 

Voici donc quelques Tx du 28/01 en France :

 

14.3° à Nice (0m)

15.2° à Valberg (1780m)

16.1° à Cannes (0m)

19.9° à Nice-Collines (300m)

18.8° à Peille (1100m)

20.2° à Sampolo (850m, Corse) = record mensuel

20.9° à Levens (650m)

21.8° à Courségoule (1000m)

23.3° à Roquestéron (400m)

23.6° à Eze (650m)

23.6° à Sospel (850m)

23.8° à Corte (400m, Corse) = record mensuel

25.2° à Berre les Alpes (700m)

 

 

A noter que le record mensuel national, en janvier, est de 27.1° à Roquestéron, relevé en... 2007!

 

Egalement 23° à Turin et Milan (Italie) et Lugano (Suisse).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tu rigoles ? Le foëhn est aussi actif en altitude qu'en vallée, c'est justement en redescendant dans une vallée qu'il provoque chaleur et assèchement. Là d'où je viens en France, il arrive que, par coup de foëhn, la température grimpe de 15 degrés, même en pleine nuit, et en fond de vallée.

Mea culpa, je me basais plus sur mon expérience qu'autre chose. Moi je viens de la vallée de l'Arve (Haute Savoie) et quand on partait skier pendant les épisodes de foehn, il me semblait qu'il était plus fort que dans la vallée. Je me souviens très bien d'une fois ou à Combloux, il faisait froid et calme en bas et en haut un vent chaud soufflait. Mais je le répète ce n'est que mon expérience personnelle.

 

Est-ce que tu viens d'une vallée moins encastrée que la mienne et est-ce qu'il est possible que le foehn descende moins dans une vallée comme celle de l'Arve ou encore de l'Arc?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

dans le Ouest Canadien encore des records de froids

These are new record low temperatures set Tuesday morning JAN 29 2008. :ph34r:

 

Edmonton.......-44.4 c!!!!! (-48 F)

Fort Mcmurray.....-43.2 c (-46 F)

Grande Prairie.....-43.7 c (-47 F)

Lethbridge.....-37.9 c (-36 F)

Peace River.....-44.7 c (-48 F)

Slave Lake......-42.2 c (-44 F)

Edson........-43.3 c (-46 F)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tu rigoles ? Le foëhn est aussi actif en altitude qu'en vallée, c'est justement en redescendant dans une vallée qu'il provoque chaleur et assèchement. Là d'où je viens en France, il arrive que, par coup de foëhn, la température grimpe de 15 degrés, même en pleine nuit, et en fond de vallée.

Mea culpa, je me basais plus sur mon expérience qu'autre chose. Moi je viens de la vallée de l'Arve (Haute Savoie) et quand on partait skier pendant les épisodes de foehn, il me semblait qu'il était plus fort que dans la vallée. Je me souviens très bien d'une fois ou à Combloux, il faisait froid et calme en bas et en haut un vent chaud soufflait. Mais je le répète ce n'est que mon expérience personnelle.

 

Est-ce que tu viens d'une vallée moins encastrée que la mienne et est-ce qu'il est possible que le foehn descende moins dans une vallée comme celle de l'Arve ou encore de l'Arc?

Je viens de Grenoble, tu dois connaître, et la vallée est suffisemment large pour laisser le vent "racler" le fond de la vallée. Mais c'est bien possible comme tu dis que le fohn puisse souffler en haut et laisser temporairement la vallée au froid (même à Grenoble, il souffle d'abord en haut).

 

Sinon glacial en effet dans l'ouest, il me semble que Brett Anderson avait depuis longtemps annoncé un temps plus froid que la normale dans l'ouest...

Edited by jtomtom
Link to comment
Share on other sites

La neige cause le chaos en Chine

 

Agence France-Presse

Pékin

En plein début des congés d'hiver du nouvel an lunaire, la Chine affronte une situation chaotique provoquée par la neige et le verglas, qui a déjà coûté la vie à des dizaines de personnes et forcé le gouvernement à décréter la mobilisation générale.

 

Suite de l'article: "http://www.cyberpresse.ca/article/20080129/CPMONDE/80129033/6730/CPACTUALITES"

 

Il y a des gens ici qui ont un lien avec les statistiques concernant le temps hivernale en Chine?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bon ici à Thrissur, dans le sud de l'Inde c'est tout à fait normal pour la saison, soit 30 à 34 le jour 19 à 23 la nuit.

Cependant cela pourrait bien changer pour le moi de février ...

- à suivre donc .

post-2-1201690341_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

# Rare snowstorm hits Middle East - 29 Jan 08 - Men in long Arab robes pelted each other with snowballs in the Jordanian capital, Amman, and the West Bank city of Ramallah, seat of the Palestinian government, came to a standstill. For some, it was the first time they had ever seen snow.

 

The Israeli weather service said up to 8 inches of snow fell in Jerusalem. Forecasters said temperatures were expected to drop, and the snow would continue through Thursday morning.

 

Heavy snow also was reported in the Golan Heights and the northern Israeli town of Safed, and throughout the West Bank.

 

In Amman, where a foot of snow fell, children used inflatable tubes as sleds.

 

Snow covered most mountain villages and blocked roads in Lebanon. The storm disrupted power supplies in most Lebanese towns and villages, exacerbating existing power cuts. Parts of the Beirut-Damascus highway were closed.

 

Temperatures in Syria dipped below freezing and snow blanketed the hills overlooking the capital, Damascus.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080130/ap_on_...ast_snowstorm_1

Thanks to Jimmy Walter for this link

 

 

# Jerusalem blanketed with heavy snow - 29 Jan 08 - Heavy snowfall blanketed Jerusalem and surrounding areas Tuesday night. The inclement weather swept across not only Jerusalem, as the Golan Heights saw an accumulation of dozens of centimeters of snow.

 

Higher elevations throughout the country are likely to be covered with snow over the next two days, according to Israel Meteorological Service forecaster Uri Batz. Jerusalem can expect about 10 cm. of snow by Wednesday night and another 10 by late Thursday.

 

Batz said the Carmel Hills, near Haifa, would probably get a light layer of snow, something that hasn't happened since 2000. Even Eilat residents will likely be able to enjoy the sight of snow on the tops of the Edom Mountains across the Jordanian border.

 

The forecaster said that with strong winds, the temperature in the capital could plummet to as low as -9º C, freezing any water on the roads and sidewalks.

 

http://www.jpost.com/servlet/Satellite?cid...icle%2FShowFull

Thanks to Robert Branch for this link

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7217429.stm

c'est fou y neige partout :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey salut Fozzy... Même si tu nous fait un peu suer avec ton 34 ha ha ha.

 

Prends du bon temps là bas, ici pour les prochains jours ça ne sera pas la ''joyeuseté'' ;)

Ouff moi je n'ai plus rien à suer- he he

 

Le mois de février et le début mars est sec ici en temps normal mais on vas voir avec ce qu'il y a au nord - Himalaya etc.

La Chine y a gouté aussi dernièrement, on en parle beaucoup dans les journeaux ici -

 

Bon, pour vous, un hivers intéressant donc et à suivre puisque ça fait le tour de la planet ces trucs la -

 

Bonne fin de tempête Québec !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

by brett anderson accuweather...

 

My February Forecast

Sunday, February 03, 2008

Here are my thoughts about February across Canada

 

Newfoundland: Overall, February looks stormy. Temperatures early in the month will be slightly above normal then back to normal mid-month. Temperatures late in the month might end up colder compared to normal. In terms of precipitation, I expect a snowy month across central and northern Newfoundland, while the far south might have to deal with several storms that bring snow and perhaps some rain. As it turns colder late in the month it should begin to dry out some.

 

Nova Scotia/PEI: February will be an unsettled month overall, with several storm systems moving in from the southwest. In terms of snowfall, I expect slightly above-normal amounts, since there will be a few storms that bring more of a mix/rain compared to snow. The end of the month might turn drier. In terms of temperature, I expect slightly warmer than normal temperatures early in the month, then near-normal readings mid-month. It might turn colder than normal late in the month.

 

New Brunswick: Early February will be mild compared to normal, then trend back to normal mid-month. Much colder weather could return late in the month. Much of early and mid-February will bring above-normal precipitation, with above-normal snowfall, especially the northern two-thirds. Drier conditions should return late in the month.

 

Quebec: The first half of the month will bring above-normal snowfall as a series of storm systems track close by, but temperatures across the south will be slightly milder than normal, while the north is seasonably cold. More of a northwesterly flow of air will return the second half of the month, leading to colder and drier weather.

 

Ontario: Precipitation across southern Ontario will be greater than normal the first half of the month, with near-normal amounts of snow. Snowfall across northern Ontario the first half of the month will be slightly less than normal. The second half of the month should gradually turn drier. In terms of temperature, The first half of the month will be milder than normal across the south and near-normal in the north. Temperatures will be close to normal throughout much of the province the second half of the month.

 

Manitoba: Snowfall will be close to normal across the south the first half of the month and below-normal in the north. Snowfall will be below normal throughout much of the province the second half of the month. In terms of temperature, the north will be colder than normal the first half of the month then trend back to normal, if not slightly above the second part of the month. Temperatures across the south will greatly fluctuate between very cold and normal the first half of the month, while the second half of the month will be more consistent and not be as cold.

 

Saskatchewan:: The first two weeks of the month will be colder than normal with above-normal snowfall as a series of fast-moving systems move through. The north will be especially cold. Temperatures will trend back to normal the third week of the month and perhaps slightly above-normal late. Snowfall should be close to normal the second half of the month across the province.

 

Alberta:: Expect large temperature fluctuations the first half of the month with short periods of very cold weather followed by a quick, but brief warm up. Temperatures the second half of the month will trend slightly above-normal across the south, near-normal in the mountains and slightly colder than normal in the north. I think for the most part, snowfall the first two weeks of the month will be greater than normal, then slightly less than normal last two weeks. The mountains should see above-normal snowfall throughout much of the month.

 

British Columbia: The first half of the month will be rather stormy across western British Columbia with a series of Pacific fronts impacting the region, meaning plenty of coastal rain (the exception being the eastern downslope areas of Vancouver Island) and mountain snow, which keeps the good news flowing for the ski areas. Temperatures across the south the first half of the month will be near to slightly above normal, while the north will be colder than normal. The second half of the month will bring slightly above-normal temperatures to much of the province. In terms of precipitation, not as stormy across the southwest, but stormy, with plenty of snow in the north.

 

Short term briefly

 

I will be talking about a few storms this week. We have the potential for accumulating snow from central and eastern Ontario through Quebec, northern New Brunswick and interior Newfoundland Wednesday and Wednesday night. A couple of storms could also bring accumulating snow from the Canadian Rockies through the western prairies this week, especially in a line from north of Red Deer, AB to Saskatoon, Sask. Also, A storm will bring a small accumulation of snow to the Sudbury/North Bay, Ontario region Monday night, followed by some sleet and freezing rain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Near-Record Warmth Monday Feb 4 2008.

 

Southwesterly winds will spread unseasonably warm air through Texas and into Oklahoma and Arkansas during the day Monday. Afternoon temperatures could reach the lower 80s as far north as Dallas, Texas and even set some records.

 

accuweather.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pendant ce temps en Chine.....il fait froid. Les glaciers fondent en Arctique mais il fait plus froid ailleurs (Chine et Antartique). Globalement et j'insiste sur le mot globalement, est-ce que la planète se réchauffe réellement?

 

Millions of people remain stranded in parts of China after a prolonged period of heavy snow and extreme cold. The weather across the disaster-stricken regions will continue to improve over the next few days, but cold and fog could continue to pose travel problems. Railways, some of which have been blocked for days have finally begun to move again, but it is a slow process. The weather was the coldest in 100 years in central Hubei and Hunan provinces, according to the China Meteorological Administration.

 

Story by AccuWeather.com senior Meteorologist Brett Anderson.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Une question comme ça...c'est quoi le nom de ce super barrage qui vient d'être construit en Chine, déjà ? En tk, le réservoir d'eau en question, en plus de provoquer d'immenses vagues lorsqu'il y a des éboulements sur ses rives, et en plus de provoquer une érosions préoccupante des rives, ne risque-t-il pas, jusqu'à un certain point, de changer le climat de la région ? Ne risque-t-il pas de provoquer des tempêtes de neige là où il n'y en avait pas avant ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Une question comme ça...c'est quoi le nom de ce super barrage qui vient d'être construit en Chine, déjà ? En tk, le réservoir d'eau en question, en plus de provoquer d'immenses vagues lorsqu'il y a des éboulements sur ses rives, et en plus de provoquer une érosions préoccupante des rives, ne risque-t-il pas, jusqu'à un certain point, de changer le climat de la région ? Ne risque-t-il pas de provoquer des tempêtes de neige là où il n'y en avait pas avant ?

c'est un point interressant il faudrait trouver les spécifications du bassin du barrage pour connairtre sa superficie et la masse d'eau qu'il contient

Link to comment
Share on other sites

si ça peut aider...

Situé dans la province de Hubei, près de la ville de Yichang, le barrage des Trois Gorges est le plus important du monde pour le contrôle des eaux et la productivité hydroélectrique. Née d'une déviation du fleuve Chang Jiang, l'ouvrage est structuré autour d'un réservoir d'une superficie de 1084 km2. Surclassant le barrage d'Itaïpu au Brésil, la centrale hydroélectrique comprend deux sections séparée par un déversoir : à gauche longue de 644 mètres avec 14 turboalternateurs, à droite s'étirant sur 59.5 mètres comptant 12 turboalternateurs. L'ensemble offre une puissance de 18 720 MW. Le barrage devrait fournir 10 % de la consommation chinoise en électricité.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Une question comme ça...c'est quoi le nom de ce super barrage qui vient d'être construit en Chine, déjà ? En tk, le réservoir d'eau en question, en plus de provoquer d'immenses vagues lorsqu'il y a des éboulements sur ses rives, et en plus de provoquer une érosions préoccupante des rives, ne risque-t-il pas, jusqu'à un certain point, de changer le climat de la région ? Ne risque-t-il pas de provoquer des tempêtes de neige là où il n'y en avait pas avant ?

c'est un point interressant il faudrait trouver les spécifications du bassin du barrage pour connairtre sa superficie et la masse d'eau qu'il contient

Le barrage des Trois Gorges

 

Selon M. Xie Xiufa, un spécialiste de la conservation de l'eau et ingénieur principal au Comité de Ressources de l'Eau du fleuve Yangtzé, le projet de contrôle de l'eau des Trois Gorges "a accordé" le climat local : "Nous avons observé une élévation moyenne de la température de 0.2°C, une élévation entre 0.3 et 1°C en hiver, mais une chute entre 0.9 et 1.2°C en été. Ainsi nous avons des hivers plus chauds et des étés plus frais dans le secteur du barrage".

 

http://www.astrosurf.com/luxorion/barrage-trois-gorges.htm

 

Et le point de vue d'un journal chinois :

http://french.peopledaily.com.cn/VieSociale/4372541.html

 

L'évapotranspiration de toute la région va forcément être décuplée, et on ne parle pas de petite région mais d'une surface inondée de la taille de de l'Angleterre!!

 

Pour des chiffres et des données à sensation voir le site suivant (site de confiance tout de même) :

http://internationalrivers.org/en/china/three-gorges-dam

 

Guillaume.

Edited by ti'gui
Link to comment
Share on other sites

La navette STS-122 :

 

Départ possiblement retardé à cause d'orages dans le secteur.

 

2 p.m. Less than an hour before launch, the weather conditions have turned unacceptable because of a thunderstorm near Kennedy Space Center. Forecasters are hoping there is enough time for the storm to move away from the launch site before the planned 2:45 p.m. launch.

 

Source : NASA - Launch Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...